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The Barcoding Facility for Organisms and Tissues of Policy Concern (BopCo) aims at developing an expertise forum to facilitate the identification of biological samples of policy concern. Such identifications can rely on traditional morphology-based approaches requiring taxonomic expertise and/or DNA-based techniques demanding specific skills and access to a fully equipped molecular laboratory.

The intent of BopCo therefore is (1) to act as a focal point for identifying biological materials upon request, using both morphological and DNA-based techniques, (2) to produce well-documented DNA barcodes of relevant taxa, (3) to maintain reference collections of barcoded organisms and the corresponding DNA barcode databases, and (4) to explore and implement new tools and techniques for species identification and DNA barcoding.
 

      

Acoela and Nemertodermatida are marine worms that occur abundantly in sandy or silty sediments as well as among algae. Most of the species are members of the meiofauna (a mixed assemblage of small animals that will pass through a 250 µm sieve). Currently there are about 400 named species of Acoela and 9 species of Nemertodermatida.
 
A number of molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that acoels and nemertodermatids are not part of Platyhelminthes as previously thought. Their precise position in the animal tree of life is still contentious. Most of the recent studies indicate that they form early branches within Bilateria, which would make them pivotal to understanding the emergence of complex animals.
Taxonomic work on these soft bodied, fragile and microscopic animals requires special techniques. Their diversity and abundance will not be captured in a standard survey of marine biodiversity. Consequently they are rarley included in ecological and environmental studies.
The purpose of the Stylet is to provide comprehensive data on taxonomy, distributions, specimens, literature and original images regarding acoels and nemertodermatids. We will keep a forum open to engage in feedback and further communication. Welcome!

This site shares information about the world species of Microgastrinae parasitoid waps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). There are over 2,560 described species of microgastrines, and an additional 20-40,000 remain undescribed, making this group one of the most diverse among parasitoid wasps. Microgastrines can be found in all major terrestrial ecosystems, from as north as 82°30' N in the Canadian Arctic (Alert, Ellesmere Island) to as south as 55° S in South America (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina and Chile) and 50° S in New Zealand (the subantarctic Auckland Islands). They have also been collected up to at least 4,000 meters of altitude (in the Andes and the Himalayas). These wasps parasitize caterpillars of moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera), and thus are one of the most important groups in the biological control of agriculture and forestry pests.
Photos, host records, and distribution data for as many species/genera as possible are included. We are keeping an updated checklist of world species, and also provide information on regional/local lists of species, as part of ongoing research projects. And we will keep a blog to post on other topics related to this fascinating group of wasps. Check "How to use this site" (http://microgastrinae.myspecies.info/content/how-use-site) for suggestions on how to navigate the resources and data available. And if you want to reference this website, check "How to cite us" (http://microgastrinae.myspecies.info/content/how-cite-us).
We invite anyone interested in parasitoids of caterpillars to join this site, browse its contents, contribute/revise data, and help us to improve our work here. Thank you for visiting, and we hope that you come back soon!

This site shares information about the Iranian species of Braconidae parasitoid waps (Ichneumonoidea: Braconidae). These wasps parasitize caterpillars of moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera), and thus are one of the most important groups in the biological control of agriculture and forestry pests.
Photos, host records, and distribution data for as many species/genera as possible are included. We are keeping an updated checklist of Iranian species, and also provide information on regional/local lists of species, as part of ongoing research projects. And we will keep a blog to post on other topics related to this fascinating group of wasps. Check "How to use this site" (http://cyberbraconid.myspecies.info/node/3) for suggestions on how to navigate the resources and data available. And if you want to reference this website, check "How to cite us" (http://cyberbraconid.myspecies.info/node/3).
We invite anyone interested in parasitoids of caterpillars to join this site, browse its contents, contribute/revise data, and help us to improve our work here. Thank you for visiting, and we hope that you come back soon!